Moving Forward: From old plants to new planets

Moving Forward: From old plants to new planets

Editor's note: This new section we're calling "Moving Forward" aims to bring together all the newest developments and breakthroughs concerning technology, nature and humans.
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Following are the top eight most recent developments in our world.

1. One in five of the world's plant species are at risk of extinction, a global report has shown, according to The Guardian.

According to The Guardian, the destruction of habitats, including for farming, such as palm oil production (pictured), is one of the main factors threatening plants. Credit: Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images

According to The Guardian, the destruction of habitats, including for farming, such as palm oil production (pictured), is one of the main factors threatening plants. Credit: Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images

2. More than 1,250 new planets were discovered through NASA's Kepler space telescope.

A concept picture depicts the planetary discoveries made to date by NASA's Kepler space telescope. Credit: NASA/W. Stenzel

A concept picture depicts the planetary discoveries made to date by NASA's Kepler space telescope. Credit: NASA/W. Stenzel

3. Air pollution is rising at a startling rate in many cities across the globe, with the poorest cities being the most at risk, according to the World Health Organization.

Smoking chimneys in front of residential buildings in Tianjin, China, Jan. 17, 2013. Credit: Reuters/Petar Kujundzic

Smoking chimneys in front of residential buildings in Tianjin, China, Jan. 17, 2013. Credit: Reuters/Petar Kujundzic

4. The world's oldest person, Susannah Mushatt Jones, died in New York City at age 116. That made Italy's Emma Morano, 116, the new oldest living person and the last verified living person to have been born in the 19th century.

Italy's Emma Morano, the world's oldest living person. Credit: Sanatate.bzi.ro (full link)

Italy's Emma Morano, the world's oldest living person. Credit: Sanatate.bzi.ro (full link)

5. NASA detected atomic oxygen in the Martian atmosphere.

Viking 1 images composite of Mars by USGS University of Arizona. The Viking 1 Mission was flown in June of 1976. Credit: NASA

Viking 1 images composite of Mars by USGS University of Arizona. The Viking 1 Mission was flown in June of 1976. Credit: NASA

6. April 2016 broke global temperature records, marking seven months of new highs as it was the hottest April ever recorded.

Darkest red shadings correspond to areas that had temperatures the farthest above average in April. Credit: NOAA

Darkest red shadings correspond to areas that had temperatures the farthest above average in April. Credit: NOAA

7. Renewable energy smashed global records in 2015, a report has shown, after more worldwide investment and implementation of clean energy than ever before.

Credit: Ren21.net (full link)

Credit: Ren21.net (full link)

8. All scientific papers and research supported by public and public-private funds will be free and available to everyone by 2020 under EU proposals.

The Competitiveness Council meeting in Brussels, where European leaders called for an immediate open access to all scientific papers by 2020. Credit: EU Competitiveness Council

The Competitiveness Council meeting in Brussels, where European leaders called for an immediate open access to all scientific papers by 2020. Credit: EU Competitiveness Council

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