Easy to follow tips on how to achieve SDG 10 “Reduced Inequalities”

Easy to follow tips on how to achieve SDG 10 “Reduced Inequalities”

In 2008, the United Nations University (UNU) and the World Institute for Development and Economic Research (WIDER) ran a study on global wealth and they found out that the coefficient for global wealth inequalities, a number ranging from 0 (total equality) to 1 (total inequality), was at 0.89. In other words, if we had a world population made of ten people, one of them would have $1.000 and the other nine would have only $1 each.

As crazy as it may seem, inequalities based on gender, age, ethnicity, class, race, sexuality and religion continue to be one of the world’s most persistent problems. Women living in rural areas are three times more likely to die of childbirth than those living in urban centers. Many families in developing countries today live in societies where income is more unequal than what it used to be in the 1990s. But don’t think that this is a problem concerning developing countries only, because it’s not. In fact, even the richest countries still have to deal with racism, homophobia and religious intolerance. Therefore, inequality is a global problem affecting all of us, no matter who we are or where we are from.  

  Credit: unsplash.com

Credit: unsplash.com

If, for whatever reason, people keep being excluded from opportunities, services and the chance at a better life, sustainable development will not be achieved. And this is because inequality is a danger to societies on multiple levels: socially, economically and environmentally. In fact, inequalities in income and wealth lead to economic instability, a variety of health and social problems, and prevent societies from adopting pro-environment strategies and behaviour. Social and economic inequalities damage the social fabric, undermine social cohesion, contribute to environmental problems and prevent nations, communities and individuals from flourishing.

However, reducing inequalities is possible and it requires a transformative change. Countries need to promote inclusive social and economic growth, eliminating discriminatory laws, policies and practices; and this is something way bigger that ourselves, but, nonetheless, there are other things that we, as Millennials, can do to help. For example:

- Speak up against any type of discrimination in your country and let everyone know that we all should have the same opportunities regardless of race, gender, sexuality, social background and physical abilities.

- In your community, be inclusive and understanding of those who are different than yourself.

- Support policies that promote social and economic inclusion.

- Join YWCA’s campaigns to end racism and other inequalities (https://www.ywca.org/).

- Support the GRIN campaign to promote equal education for the LGBTQ community and marginalized youth (http://www.grincampaign.com/Home.html).

- Follow “World Enabled” in their mission to end discrimination against disabilities (http://worldenabled.org/who-we-are/).

These are just a few “little” things, but nevertheless important, that you can put into practice in order to give your contribution to end inequalities. Remember, every great thing has to start somewhere. Start small and greater things will come! And if you’re already involved with any kind of initiative that aims at achieving this goal, join our competition here: https://goo.gl/5LUfP2

Cover cartoon credit: Sergio Algeri/GYV

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