Toxic myths social media has perpetuated about life [Part II]

Toxic myths social media has perpetuated about life [Part II]

After debunking some of the biggest social media-perpetuated myths in the first article of this series, we take on more prevalent misconceptions to renounce for a better life in part II.

Jaw-dropping lifestyle pictures and glam-packed Instagram feeds have planted a distorted vision of day-to-day life in the minds of young internet users, promoting an increasingly prevalent ‘compare and despair’ paradigm, which does not only contribute to setting unrealistic life expectations in the broad sense of the term, but has also been scientifically proven to induce toxic feelings of inadequacy and low self-esteem in teens and young adults. And while it may be hard to counter the debilitating impact of this vicious social media cycle, the road to mental salvations starts by reminding ourselves that what we see on social media is NOT the standard but rather a partial, overtly pampered and often superficial, fraction of reality.

A drastic majority of the content you come across daily on social media, be it generated by friends and acquaintances or brands and influencers, has been carefully altered for added appeal through filters, corrective editing and/or other digital enhancements, not to mention that every piece of content that makes it online is often the result of many underlying attempts that almost never make it to the web [just imagine the number of selfies that end up in your camera roll in your quest for the perfect selfie angle!]. Sometimes people’s images are altered to the point where they become practically unrecognizable, which might conversely lead to more engagement (like/comments) in the online world. This is one reason why we might fall into the trap of emulating a different look/personality for added popularity or self-fulfillment purposes when in fact we’d only be perpetuating the fakeness rule as opposed to individuality and uniqueness.  

Well, even when everything makes it seem so, you don’t. If your online content is not getting the attention you think it deserves, then this does not necessarily mean you should be put down or discouraged from doing your thing. Social media is a fickle universe: one day someone’s totally in, and the next day they’re out and/or forgotten. Instead of striving for apprehension and likes, focus instead on optimizing your content and finding your niche audience as this is where your impact will be measurable/significant.

Cover credit: Gerd Altmann/Pixabay

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Toxic myths social media has perpetuated about life [Part I]

Toxic myths social media has perpetuated about life [Part I]