Toxic myths social media has perpetuated about life [Part I]

Toxic myths social media has perpetuated about life [Part I]

Social media has infiltrated modern-day lifestyle to the core, reaching all the way to the fundamental structures of society and relationships. And while it is quite impossible to reverse/escape its far-reaching impact, there are certain toxic social media-perpetuated myths that we need to stop believing for a better life.

Join us as we debunk some of the myths in our new series!

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Social networking platforms such as Instagram are essentially meant for people to showcase their best lifestyle moments as opposed to their failures/difficulties. This foundational mechanism has been the precursor to the now-thriving notion of online influencers and their Insta-wired glam-packed lifestyles, but its inherent one-sidedness, on the other hand, has become detrimental to many users’ self-esteem/life standards, ultimately morphing into one big collective (not to say universal) illusion. So, before you get too carried away by Instagram fairytales, dust off your illusions by reminding yourself that the dust that lies beneath the shiny surface, which can hardly ever be reflected in pictures/filters/captions, is what makes us human.

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Do you ever look at heated online debates and realize two seconds later that the controversy at hand is too insignificant/relative to count as a controversy in the first place (let alone be given that much attention)? You’re not alone! Because that is in fact the case for most modern-day social media controversies that ultimately go on to wither away/lose impact just as fast as they came into the spotlight. Please do not feel pressured to have a opinion on everything that happens in the world, the world is old enough to take care of itself without the need for 3,908,789,056,478 opinions at a time.

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I’m pretty sure I’ve written this before, but I might as well write it again: your success does not depend on how well you’re doing compared to other people but rather on how well you’re doing compared to the resources at your disposal (be them personal, financial, academic, professional or otherwise). Social media has perpetuated a toxic scheme of constant comparison/competitiveness that is dangerous enough to affect your mental health. Instead of wasting time and energy on tracking other people’s social media-exhibited accomplishments (which might not always be what they seem to start with), focus on tracking your own progress and setting customized milestones for yourself. Success is measured by personal scale, not by comparison.

Toxic myths social media has perpetuated about life [Part II]

Toxic myths social media has perpetuated about life [Part II]

Millennial Tips: Make better friends with yourself with these 4 tips

Millennial Tips: Make better friends with yourself with these 4 tips