5 Indian millennials are using technology to solve health problems

5 Indian millennials are using technology to solve health problems

A few days ago, The Economic Times shed light on five prominent Indian millennials who, inspired by their personal experience, are developing brilliant tech solutions to solve health problems. Join us as we go over each of their impactful initiatives.

Harsh Songra Credit: Facebook

Harsh Songra
Credit: Facebook

1. MyChild. When he was 11, Harsh Songra was diagnosed with dyspraxia, a chronic neurological disorder, and teased for his clumsiness by schoolmates. "One in six children suffer from developmental disorders that are undiagnosed. I wanted to help create awareness", he noted. In 2015, he developed MyChild, an app that tracks children’s health for up to two years to help detect potential developmental delays. Parents can use the app to request expert advice/learn more about their child’s condition through videos and other relevant media. At just 21, Songra has received appreciation from Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg and made it to Forbes’ 30 under 30 list for 2016.

Akash Manoj Credit: Facebook

Akash Manoj
Credit: Facebook

2. Save Heart. Following the unexpected death of his grandfather, 6-year-old Indian boy Akash Manoj learned that 85 percent of heart attacks cannot be diagnosed as there are no symptoms. But he discovered that the heart sends out an SOS before failing and thought that this signal could be isolated and used as a warning system, so he began doing research on silent heart attacks. After three years of trial and error, Manoj developed Save Heart, a sensor to detect silent heart attacks. The product is set to be launched by 2019.

Arsh Shah Dilbagi Credit: Facebook

Arsh Shah Dilbagi
Credit: Facebook

3. Talk: Converting breath into speech. When he was 16, Arsh Shah Dilbagi took his grandmother to the hospital for a check-up. It was there that a crying man caught his attention. The patient was unable to speak or express his problem. The boy got curious and started doing research on ways to help people with neurological disorders. Just a year later, Dilbagi came up with a device that converts breath into speech. Sold at just $100, it is cheaper than other devices on the market and does not require a laptop to operate.

Pune Jahnavi Joshi and Nupura Kirloskar Credit: Facebook

Pune Jahnavi Joshi and Nupura Kirloskar
Credit: Facebook

4. Blee Watch. After watching a performance by deaf dancers who followed visual cues from a teacher, Pune Jahnavi Joshi and Nupura Kirloskar, students at the MIT Institute of Design, started exploring ways in which deaf people could sense music with an aid. "We wondered how there could be dance without music," Joshi explained. They conceived a way to convert sound into vibration and created Blee Watch, a vibrating device that alerts users to sounds. The two friends have entered a series of competitions to raise funds that would help them launch their product onto the market.

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