Will millennials reject Trump? Professor Jeffrey Sachs argues yes

Will millennials reject Trump? Professor Jeffrey Sachs argues yes

Jeffrey Sachs, director of the Earth Institute, Columbia University, speaks at the plenary session of the IMF conference at the Sheraton San Cristobal Hotel December 6, 2014 in Santiago, Chile. Cover source: International Monetary Fund/Flickr

Jeffrey Sachs, director of the Earth Institute, Columbia University, speaks at the plenary session of the IMF conference at the Sheraton San Cristobal Hotel December 6, 2014 in Santiago, Chile. Cover source: International Monetary Fund/Flickr

A prominent university academic has argued that current U.S. President Donald Trump will be rejected by millennials, raising some questions over how the next election in America will pan out.

In a post on Syndicate Project, Sachs, a professor of health policy and management at Columbia University, argued that the political gap throughout America is “not between party or states; it is between generations.”

Evidence taken from exit polls in the election last year showed that a clear majority of young people voted against Trump, contrasting with the 53 percent of people aged 45 or older and 42 percent of those aged 30 to 44 who voted for him.

Sachs broke his analysis down into three main components, the first being aspects of perception that were also shown to be a major force of division. The older crowd grew up at a time in which tendencies towards racial and societal diversity was more narrow.

The same also applies to LGBTQ+ which were all frowned upon through much of the 20th century. Young people are more accepting and tolerant in today’s society, something that would translate into their political views.

His second reason was the economic conditions that young people find themselves in today. Trump is gradually changing the regulatory system to favor tax cuts, thus giving more support to benefit the old and rich.

Over time, millennials will recognize this problem and move to choose a system that better suits them. This would be “the opposite policy: higher taxes on the wealth of the older generation in order to finance post-secondary education, job training, renewable-energy infrastructure, and other investments in America’s future.”

Finally, Sachs stated that the younger crowd is far more aware of climate change and other threats to the environment. A tone of ignorance is said to hang over the older generation who never learned about environmental responsibility: “Older Americans didn’t learn about climate change in school. They were never introduced to the basic science of greenhouse gases. That is why they are ready to put their own short-term financial interests ahead of the dire threats to their grandchildren’s generation.”

When considering Sachs’ reasoning, there’s plenty of evidence to suggest that young voters could have a dramatic impact on future elections in the U.S., their input perhaps being enough to swing the next one towards their own values and beliefs.

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