Global Youth Wellbeing Index 2017: Key findings

Global Youth Wellbeing Index 2017: Key findings

Young people aged 15 to 29 make up over 1.8 billion of today’s world population. And while many of them have access to more academic, professional and technological resources than ever, others struggle with economic opportunities, citizen participation and even vital skills at times.

 The full report is available for download  here . Source and credit:  International Youth Foundation

The full report is available for download here. Source and credit: International Youth Foundation

This is where the Global Youth Wellbeing Index 2017 comes in to help evaluate the quality of life pertaining to youth today with regard to key sustainable development goals and actively call for increased investment in this particular chunk of the population.

Created by the International Youth Foundation (IYF) in partnership with Hilton, the index is based on data collected through the foundation’s Global Millennial Viewpoints Survey across 30 different countries and seven major domains: Gender Equality, Economic Opportunity, Education, Health, Safety & Security, Citizen Participation and Information & Communication Technology.

Join us as we take a quick look at some of the top findings:

Mental health is a major concern to youth today. The report highlights the urgency of the need to give youth better access to mental health care given that 50 percent of participants felt their lives were too stressful, while more than half believed the way they feel to get in the way of their academic, professional and personal lives.

Young people are not always getting enough preparation for life and work through education. While youth do in fact have the highest levels of wellbeing in terms of education, this does not necessarily make them prepared to achieve success in life and/or the workplace, which implies the need to better equip them for the pressures and challenges of real life.

 Source:  PxHere

Source: PxHere

Road-related accidents are the leading cause of death for youth worldwide. Index countries were only able to reduce road-related deaths by 21 percent from 1990 to 2015. “Middle-income countries account for 90 percent of traffic-related deaths,” the report reads.

Many young people feel that their government does not care about them. The Global Millennial Viewpoints Survey also revealed that 2 out of 3 young people believe their government could not care less about their needs.

Gender equality is of prime importance to youth. An overwhelming majority (almost 90 percent) of surveyed youth stated their support for gender equality in all its forms. This being said, objective data still suggests that equality remains elusive, according to the report.

Most young people rely on their phones to get information. Given youth’s lack of robust internet access through computers in less developed countries (interestingly, less than half of youth have internet access at home) most of them rely on their phones rather than computers to get information.

 Cover credit:  ITU Pictures / Flickr

Cover credit: ITU Pictures/Flickr

Youth wellbeing is improving, albeit slowly. Judging by comparative data from previous years, youth wellbeing in all Index countries increased by an average of 2 percent. And while Sweden, Australia, the United Kingdom and Germany rank highest in terms of overall wellbeing, less developed countries such as India, Uganda, Egypt and Nigeria rank the lowest on the spectrum.

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