The next Albert Einstein? Sabrina Pasterski leads the way for budding millennial scientists

The next Albert Einstein? Sabrina Pasterski leads the way for budding millennial scientists

Sabrina Pasterski. Credit: All credits go to Michael Noble Jr./Chicago Tribune/TNS

Sabrina Pasterski. Credit: All credits go to Michael Noble Jr./Chicago Tribune/TNS

Sabrina Pasterski, 23, is one of many young minds in American science pushing the boundaries and exploring the deepest mysteries of our planet. She now stands as one of the brightest rising stars in the sector worldwide.

Originating from Chicago and specializing in string theory and high energy physics, the Cuban American’s achievements stretch back many years. During her first flying lesson in 2003, she developed a strong interest in aviation that continued to grow alongside a set of engineering skills.

At age of 14, she reached her first milestone by receiving approval from MIT for a single engine plane she had built before eventually going on to graduate from the university in 2013, obtaining its highest GPA of 5.0.

Between then and 2016, she has worked on the Large Hadron Collider in Europe, written numerous scientific papers and participated in various talks and keynotes, most recently the first Young Women’s Honors event on Dec. 19. She is currently a PhD student at Harvard at the Center for the Fundamental Laws of Nature.

In the scientific sector, she is best known for a project called “The Triangle,” a study of asymptotic symmetries and electromagnetic memory under the forces of gravity.

Her work and achievements have sparked the interest of several NASA officials and even Amazon.com CEO Jeff Bezos. Both offered her full-time positions at their companies. She has also been cited by the likes of Professor Stephen Hawking and physicist Malcolm Perry in the U.K. and Andrew Strominger in the U.S.

Sabrina prides herself on “spotting elegance within the chaos” and continues her work in physics. When asked about her love of the subject, she told Yahoo: “Physics itself is exciting enough. It’s not like a 9-to-5 thing. When you’re tired you sleep, and when you’re not, you do physics.” This approach may well result in some astounding discoveries in the future.

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