5 grammar goofs no one should be making in 2016

5 grammar goofs no one should be making in 2016

Cover credit: Litreactor

Cover credit: Litreactor

Can we please spare the English language these grammatical atrocities once and for all?

1. Their/There/They're

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Credit: Tumblr

Sentence example: They're waiting in their car over there.

This trio tops of the list of most commonly misused words in the English language. "Their" is a possessive pronoun which serves as the plural equivalent of "his" or "her" (and "its" too) while "there" is an adverb used to indicate a certain location where the speaker is not, just like "here" is used to refer to the place where the speaker is. "They’re," on the other hand, is simply a shortened form (contraction) of "they are."

2. Your/You're

Credit: Buzzfeed

Credit: Buzzfeed

Sentence example: Go rest in your room if you're still tired.

"You're" is a contraction of "you" and "are" while "your" is a possessive pronoun. But people often tend to confuse the two, notably in the course of online communication. When in doubt, try using "you are" in your sentence instead. If the sentence still makes sense, then "you're" is eventually the correct alternative and vice versa.

3. Quiet/Quite

Credit: WordPress

Credit: WordPress

Sentence example: It is quite difficult for me to keep quiet in such a situation.

"Quiet" is an adjective that means "silent" or "discreet" while "quite" is an adverb that indicates the extent or degree of something (could mean absolutely/totally or else fairly/somewhat, depending on the context).

4. It's/Its

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Credit: Gifrific.com (full link)

Sentence example: It's funny when my cat starts moving its tail to the beat of this music.

"Its" is a possessive pronoun while "it's" is a contraction of either "it is" or "it has." Try formulating your sentence using "it is" when in doubt. If the sentence sounds incorrect, then "its" is most probably the correct alternative.

5. Lose/Loose

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Credit: Tumblr

Sentence example: I didn't pack my loose shirt because I was afraid to lose it.

To "lose" something is to not be able to have it/find it (it eventually becomes lost). The adjective "loose," however, is used to refer to something that is not tight (as in clothing) or not tightly fixed in place (a knot for instance) while the verb "loose" means to set free or release.

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