5 résumé mistakes no one should be making in 2016

5 résumé mistakes no one should be making in 2016

Catching up on the ever-evolving dynamics of what makes a good résumé can get a little confusing at times, yet is definitely worth your time and effort.

Do not let the following résumé mistakes hinder your way toward the job of your dreams.

1. Stating the obvious

Credit: Moviepilot.com

Credit: Moviepilot.com

Many job seekers fall into the trap of indulging on obviousness in their résumés, especially when it comes to adding superfluous words and phrases. Remember that the whole thing should ideally fit on one page so there is no point whatsoever in adding “Address:” before your address, “Phone:” before your phone number or “Email:” before your email. No employer is going to mix up your email address and phone number if you do not include such indicators, you can trust me on that! Just type in the actual information directly for brevity’s sake.

2. Too much text

Credit: Glee.wikia.com

Credit: Glee.wikia.com

If you think writing extensively about your past experiences resonates favorably with employers, then you’re most probably wrong. Nobody wants to read cliché-packed nonsense. Why write novel-length job descriptions when even the most demanding job duties can be summed up in one or two well-written sentences? Learn to prioritize quality over quantity.

3. Typos/bad grammar

Credit: Imgfave.com

Credit: Imgfave.com

PROOFREAD. PROOFREAD. PROOFREAD. You simply cannot afford making a single typo in your résumé in today’s highly competitive job market. Same goes for grammar mistakes and weak sentence structures. In times of doubt, your best bet would be to consult with a language expert, business professional or natural-born word bender prior to sending out your résumé to potential employers.

4. Unnecessary personal information

Credit: Giphy

Credit: Giphy

While including notions such as age, gender and marital status in your résumé might have been the norm in the past, you can totally do without these personal details nowadays. This also applies to references. Listing references at the end of your CV (or opting for the attenuated “references available upon request” alternative) has become a little passé. If an employer actually wants to get in touch with your references, they can simply request their contacts at a later stage.

5. Prioritizing style over substance

Credit: Imgur

Credit: Imgur

Do not fall into the elusive trap of wasting your time on elaborate designs while overlooking the actual subject matter. At the end of the day, employers are looking to be genuinely impressed with your résumé’s content and not just blown away by its aesthetics. But this does not mean you should go for a lackluster, overused template either. You need to find the right balance between substance and presentation.

Cover credit: Pcma.org

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