Here are the world's most prominent female millennials, according to Brit+Co

Here are the world's most prominent female millennials, according to Brit+Co

Pakistani hero Malala Yousafzai. Cover credit: Flickr

Pakistani hero Malala Yousafzai. Cover credit: Flickr

Several inspiring young women are making waves in the world, but it’s the ways they inflict change that will make them memorable for years to come.

Brit+Co, a new media and commerce company, published a few months ago a list of the world’s most prominent millennial women. Despite their young age, these women are blazing trails in their fields and empowering others to do the same.

 

Here is a selection of six inspiring women from the original list.

1. Emma Watson is more than just the main character she played in the Harry Potter film saga. In July 2014, she was named a U.N. Goodwill Ambassador, and in September the same year, she launched the HeForShe campaign, which aims to make women’s equality a men’s issue as well. With more than 6 million YouTube views, the message of her historic speech is instrumental in today’s feminist movement.

2. Since childhood, Malala Yousafzai (pictured) has been a strong advocate for women’s education. In 2012, at the age of 17, she survived a Taliban gunman’s attack while on her way to school in Pakistan. Since then she became even more adamant that women should receive the same educational opportunities as men. In October 2015, she became the youngest recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. She also has an international day in her name. World Malala Day, celebrated on July 14, was designated by the U.N. to spread awareness on girls' right to education.

3. Emma Sulkowicz’s story spread in September 2014, when the media heard about her performance artwork in protest of her rape. According to her, a fourth-year fellow student raped her in her dorm bed on the first day of her second year at Columbia University. In April 2014 she led a TitleIX complaint filed against the university for mishandling her case. She is a prominent figure in the campus sexual assault reforms.

4. While taking graduate classes in engineering at Stanford, Alice Brooks founded Roominate, a company that produces wired building toys for girls, along with her friend Bettina Chen. The company’s goal is to increase the percentage of women in STEM fields (science, technology, engineering, and math). Their toys aim to reduce the gender gap by developing problem-solving skills and confidence in girls from an early age.

5. Gwendolyn Willow Wilson is an outspoken advocate for feminism in the comics industry, strongly believing that comics aren’t just for boys. She writes one of Marvel’s best-selling series, “Ms. Marvel,” which features a Muslim girl with superpowers, a real revolution in the comics industry. She will also publish the A-Force series, the first all-female Marvel’s superhero team.

6. Beside being nominated for the title of “America’s youngest self-made female billionaire,” Elizabeth Holmes is also a college dropout. In 2003, she founded Theranos, a company that tests blood at a fraction of the time and cost of commercial labs, by using her college savings. In 2013, Walgreens announced it would open Theranos clinics in its pharmacies. In this way, she succeeded in doing something that made her famous while helping people at the same time.

 

Founded in 2011, Brit+Co offers inspirational content and online classes. It is currently reaching over 10 million people per month.

How to use social media to get the desired job​: An exclusive guide for millennials

How to use social media to get the desired job​: An exclusive guide for millennials

My Room Project captures the living spaces of millennials around the world

My Room Project captures the living spaces of millennials around the world