17 Year Old from Brooklyn Invents Gel That Closes Wounds Instantly

17 Year Old from Brooklyn Invents Gel That Closes Wounds Instantly

photo credit: wired.co

photo credit: wired.co

Joe Landolina, born 1993, is now a recognized American inventor and biomedical engineer. While freshman at New York University, he synthesized a medical gel used to heal wounds that lacerate skin, arteries and even organs. As soon as VetiGel comes in contact with blood, platelets start sticking together, creating a barrier that can refrain severe bleeding within 20 seconds. Furthermore, a few minutes after it is applied, it can be safely removed. 
The science that makes it possible is quite basic. It all begins with algae, which, in turn is composed by small polymers. Once these molecules are broken down into even smaller pieces, they are put into the gel and injected in the wound. 
"What that means, on the one hand, is that the gel will make a very strong adhesive that holds the wound together," the young inventor said. "But on the other hand, that mesh acts as a scaffold to help the body produce fibrin at the wound's surface." 
Fibrin is a protein involved in the clotting of blood, which together with platelets forms a hemostatic seal over the lesion, repairing it in the long term. This mechanism is what allows VetiGel not only to work fast in blocking blood but to also alleviate the skin. 
So far VetiGel has been approved for veterinary use, but the young scientist and now entrepreneur hopes to get approval for human use before the end of the year.
Play the short video below to gain more insights on this great invention.

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