Weekly News Highlights: Top 7 stories from June 5 to 11

From left to right: In the top row, members of the Syrian Arab Red Crescent unload food from a lorry on Thursday, forces aligned with Libya’s new unity government near Sirte, and the Euro 2016 opening ceremony. In the middle row, NATO military exercise in northwestern Poland, a hotel in Mogadishu being the site of an attack that killed 15, and migrants in the Mediterranean traveling to Europe. In the bottom row, U.S. presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton celebrating her win Tuesday. Cover credit: The Guardian (collage)

From left to right: In the top row, members of the Syrian Arab Red Crescent unload food from a lorry on Thursday, forces aligned with Libya’s new unity government near Sirte, and the Euro 2016 opening ceremony.
In the middle row, NATO military exercise in northwestern Poland, a hotel in Mogadishu being the site of an attack that killed 15, and migrants in the Mediterranean traveling to Europe.
In the bottom row, U.S. presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton celebrating her win Tuesday.
Cover credit: The Guardian (collage)

Below is a summary of the world's main news stories last week.

1. Islamist militants

A Ukrainian security agency said that a Frenchman held with a large cache of arms planned mass attacks on Euro 2016. France has launched a terror alert app ahead of the European championship.

In Niger, Boko Haram retook the town of Bosso, near the Nigerian border, overnight, after clashes with soldiers.

In Somalia, Al-Shabaab militants attacked Thursday a base used by Ethiopian troops through a suicide car bomb that killed 43 soldiers, according to the group. The African Union Force said it killed 110 Al-Shabaab militants during the attack.

In Spain, police have arrested a Moroccan man accused of recruiting people for ISIS.

In Belgium, a new Brussels attacks suspect has been arrested.

2. Syrian conflict

Syrian and Russian warplanes killed 17 people Monday hitting a market in east Syria, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights.

The U.N. said Monday that 20,000 civilians were displaced by a U.S.-backed forces offensive in the ISIS-held city of Manbij in northern Syria, which can displace 216,000 more in the coming weeks. The forces have cut off all routes into the city.

In the northwest, Syrian rebels broke Wednesday an ISIS siege. Meanwhile in Aleppo, opposition activists said that scores of people were killed after several airstrikes, including one on a hospital. President Bashar Assad vowed to fight on.

International news agency Agence France-Presse reported Thursday that Syria approved aid convoys to all of its 19 besieged towns, including Darayya in the capital's suburbs, which has received, for the first time since 2012, a one-month supply of food, but the regime started barrel bombing the town hours later.

3. U.S. elections

Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton won the California, South Dakota, New Mexico and New Jersey primaries Tuesday, bringing the number of delegates who support her to 2,777. She only needed 2,383 to secure a nomination. Clinton said she has reached a "milestone" and "made history" as the first woman to become the presumptive nominee of a major U.S. party.

U.S. Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, her Democratic rival, won in Montana and South Dakota and has only 1876 delegates but vowed to stay in the race until the party's convention in July, where delegates will formally choose a nominee for the Democratic party.

Sanders visited Obama Thursday and said he will still compete in the D.C. primary, the last one this election season, but vowed to work alongside Clinton to prevent Donald Trump, the Republican party nominee, from winning the presidency.

4. NATO war exercise

NATO, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, began Wednesday a 10-day military exercise in Poland that involved 31,000 troops and 24 countries, making it the largest war game in Eastern Europe since the end of the cold war. This has prompted Russia to improve its defense capability.

NATO is seeking to show its strength in a time when Russia's assertiveness in the region is growing.

5. Migrant crisis

At least 3,000 migrants crossing the Mediterranean to Europe were rescued while two others died, according to Italy's coastguard.

6. Libya clashes

Libya's unity government forces claimed they have retaken control of the Sirte port from ISIS, after fierce fighting with the Islamist militants.

Sirte is the hometown of former dictator Muammar Gaddafi. Its fall to Libya's forces would be a major but not final blow to ISIS, which is already under pressure in Syria and Iraq.

7. Euro 2016

The first match in the 2016 European championship of the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA), also known as Euro 2016, between France and Romania kicked off Friday at the Stade de France in Paris with tight security measures, and ended with a France win, 2-1.

Also in the news:

  • In Jerusalem, a team of experts began Monday the first renovations in over 200 years at a site where Christians believe Jesus was buried.
  • North Korea reopened a plant to produce plutonium, according to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).
  • Russian tennis player Maria Sharapova has been banned for two years by the sport's governing body, the International Tennis Federation, following a positive doping test.
  • U.S. President Barack Obama discussed with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi how to bring Paris climate agreement into force as quickly as possible.
  • In Iraq, the number of civilians trapped inside Fallujah, where U.S.-backed forces have been trying to dislodge ISIS, has risen to 90,000 from a previous estimate of 50,000. The city has been under a siege for about six months.
  • Israel froze about 83,000 entry permits for Palestinians and sent hundreds of troops into the West Bank in the wake of a terror attack that killed four Wednesday in Tel Aviv. The U.N. said the move could be collective punishment.
  • Russia unveiled a new passenger plane it says will rival Boeing and Airbus.
  • South Korea sent Friday military vessels to repel Chinese boats illegally harvesting crabs near disputed sea boundary with North Korea.